modern-wix:

Blush pink robes? We think yes! 

modern-wix:

Blush pink robes? We think yes! 

wizardhistory:

foundersofhogwarts:


Amanda Hale as a fem!Slytherin.

 requested by putresces

The madam Slytherin was a pale woman, whose hair was often kept in a tight pony tail or curled braid. She carried herself regally,  though she was often quite rigid looking to others—as if her bones were wound tightly and she were to look very stiff. But the founder often kept her chin high, and lips pursed.
In many robes of green—fur trim in the winter—she strutted into the Great Hall, her charges following her, as if her loyal subjects. She would take her seat at the long, oak table, looking out at the Hogwarts students. She looked out at her creation, the future of wizarding learning. And one thought crossed her mind, “How many impurities sit here?”

wizardhistory:

foundersofhogwarts:

Amanda Hale as a fem!Slytherin.

requested by putresces

The madam Slytherin was a pale woman, whose hair was often kept in a tight pony tail or curled braid. She carried herself regally,  though she was often quite rigid looking to others—as if her bones were wound tightly and she were to look very stiff. But the founder often kept her chin high, and lips pursed.

In many robes of green—fur trim in the winter—she strutted into the Great Hall, her charges following her, as if her loyal subjects. She would take her seat at the long, oak table, looking out at the Hogwarts students. She looked out at her creation, the future of wizarding learning. And one thought crossed her mind, “How many impurities sit here?

With an estimated 275,000 Muslim wix in the world, there is a huge number of witches in the world who wear hijab, creating a market in wixen communities for not only robes and hats, but also magical scarves. Interestingly, many non-Muslim witches in the Middle East also wear headscarves, as a carryover from pre-Islamic wixen dress, much like robes which have been worn for milennia. In fact, many wixen cultures around the world continue with traditions and styles forgotten to modern Muggles.

With an estimated 275,000 Muslim wix in the world, there is a huge number of witches in the world who wear hijab, creating a market in wixen communities for not only robes and hats, but also magical scarves. Interestingly, many non-Muslim witches in the Middle East also wear headscarves, as a carryover from pre-Islamic wixen dress, much like robes which have been worn for milennia. In fact, many wixen cultures around the world continue with traditions and styles forgotten to modern Muggles.

velvetrunway:

Tadashi Shoji S/S 2015 @ NYFWposted by fatalscroll

velvetrunway:

Tadashi Shoji S/S 2015 @ NYFW
posted by fatalscroll

A message from Anonymous
Will you be doing any suggestions of dress robes for the Yule Ball? And what about some shorter dress robes for a witch who doesn't want all that fabric hindering her? Thanks and I just love your blog!

Thanks! There are plenty of dress robes on my blog if  you look through the robes tag, but I won’t be doing anything for the Yule Ball in particular. And about shorter robes—my headcanon robes tend to be floor length, and never come above the knee at the absolute shortest. If they’re shorter than that, I don’t classify them as robes, but as Muggle or muggle-inspired clothing. Part of what I objected to in the films—and why I started this blog—is that they’d put the characters in plain dresses and just call them robes. In my head, robes are pretty fabric-y by nature. I hope that answers your questions!


sara blomqvist by ben toms for twin magazine #4


Saoirse is only the Postmaster’s apprentice, but already the owls love her best. All the mail that comes through the Diagon Alley Post comes through her, but she cares less about the letters and more about her beautiful messengers.

sara blomqvist by ben toms for twin magazine #4

Saoirse is only the Postmaster’s apprentice, but already the owls love her best. All the mail that comes through the Diagon Alley Post comes through her, but she cares less about the letters and more about her beautiful messengers.

wehadfacesthen:

Norma Shearer in a publicity photo for Marie Antoinette  (W.S. Van Dyke, 1938). The lavish costumes for the film were by Adrian.

wehadfacesthen:

Norma Shearer in a publicity photo for Marie Antoinette  (W.S. Van Dyke, 1938). The lavish costumes for the film were by Adrian.


“The Collections" Harper’s Bazaar UK August 2014 by Erik Madigan Heck

The Collections" Harper’s Bazaar UK August 2014 by Erik Madigan Heck

mepenelope:

YSL Haute Couture ss 2002.

mepenelope:

YSL Haute Couture ss 2002.


She is known as one of the greatest writers of all time, beating out muggle, witch, and wizard. Her name was Lady Joanne Grey, but most know her by her penname, K.B. Collwhisp. Grey was born in Ireland, sorted into Gryffindor House and was an extremely bright witch. 
Though, she did not wish to be a charmweaver, or a curse breaker, or even a herbologist as most witches of her times tended to be. Joanne Grey wished nothing but to be a writer, to create stories for young witches and wizards around the world. 
Alas, she was met with great resistance by readers. As Joanne Grey, her first novel, A Witch and her Bowl, detailing a story of a young witch who discovered a goblin living her in cauldron, was trashed by pureblood critics, due to the fact that Grey was a muggleborn witch, and that her stories were “unacceptable for the young witches and wizards of England.”
After that, Grey disappeared from public view—she adopted the name Collwhisp, and went on to write 347 stories—novels and short stories—and 46 poems. Collwhisp is regarded as the Grandmother of Fiction by today’s magical community around the world. According to a statistic done by the Elfwine Library of London, the world’s greatest magical library, there is a copy of The Chronicles of Collwhisp in every household, just beside The Tales of Beedle the Bard. 
Collwhisp would later only be rivaled once, by Beedle the Bard in her popularity after her death. If one follows Grey’s bloodline, they will see that famous writer William Shakespeare is her great, great grandson, who was unfortunately a squib. 

She is known as one of the greatest writers of all time, beating out muggle, witch, and wizard. Her name was Lady Joanne Grey, but most know her by her penname, K.B. Collwhisp. Grey was born in Ireland, sorted into Gryffindor House and was an extremely bright witch. 

Though, she did not wish to be a charmweaver, or a curse breaker, or even a herbologist as most witches of her times tended to be. Joanne Grey wished nothing but to be a writer, to create stories for young witches and wizards around the world. 

Alas, she was met with great resistance by readers. As Joanne Grey, her first novel, A Witch and her Bowl, detailing a story of a young witch who discovered a goblin living her in cauldron, was trashed by pureblood critics, due to the fact that Grey was a muggleborn witch, and that her stories were “unacceptable for the young witches and wizards of England.”

After that, Grey disappeared from public view—she adopted the name Collwhisp, and went on to write 347 stories—novels and short stories—and 46 poems. Collwhisp is regarded as the Grandmother of Fiction by today’s magical community around the world. According to a statistic done by the Elfwine Library of London, the world’s greatest magical library, there is a copy of The Chronicles of Collwhisp in every household, just beside The Tales of Beedle the Bard

Collwhisp would later only be rivaled once, by Beedle the Bard in her popularity after her death. If one follows Grey’s bloodline, they will see that famous writer William Shakespeare is her great, great grandson, who was unfortunately a squib. 

simplypotterheads:

Sprectrespecs were large, colourful spectacles that were given away free in an issue of The Quibbler in 1996. They were described as making their wearer look like a “demented, multicoloured owl.” They make wrackspurts, (invisible creatures that floats through one’s ears causing their brain to go fuzzy), visible to the wizarding eye, according to Luna Lovegood.

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carmidoll:

Luigi+Iango


Russian witches are more often passing on traditional fur cloaks in favor of cloaks of synthetic insulating materials of muggle creation. In Sakha, a large area within the Russian Federation where temperatures reach around -45 degrees Celsius, furs with heating charms just don’t cut the cold. The cloaks of synthetic material first appeared several years ago, and while they retain the shape of traditional cloaks, they’re warm enough “you could thaw a frost pixie in your pocket.”

carmidoll:

Luigi+Iango

Russian witches are more often passing on traditional fur cloaks in favor of cloaks of synthetic insulating materials of muggle creation. In Sakha, a large area within the Russian Federation where temperatures reach around -45 degrees Celsius, furs with heating charms just don’t cut the cold. The cloaks of synthetic material first appeared several years ago, and while they retain the shape of traditional cloaks, they’re warm enough “you could thaw a frost pixie in your pocket.”

rivesveronique:

Anton Josef Trčka -  1913


These early 20th century 7th year Durmstrang students show that what muggles call “selfies” didn’t start with their cellphones, but rather with traditional cameras and temporary hovering charms.

rivesveronique:

Anton Josef Trčka -  1913

These early 20th century 7th year Durmstrang students show that what muggles call “selfies” didn’t start with their cellphones, but rather with traditional cameras and temporary hovering charms.

carmidoll:

Mikael Jansson


A witch on the coast of Sweden wears robes that exemplify excellent stitch magic by depicting a moving, sensory Garden of Eden, and completes the ensemble with rabbit fur outer robes.

carmidoll:

Mikael Jansson

A witch on the coast of Sweden wears robes that exemplify excellent stitch magic by depicting a moving, sensory Garden of Eden, and completes the ensemble with rabbit fur outer robes.